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they be? >> i enjoyed his battles over the american second front and when to go to france. churchill wanted to go everywhere. he wanted to invade norway, sumatra, trieste, italy, sicily, somewhere in france sunday. his generals were pulling their hair out. eisenhower was. he wanted to be all over the map everywhere at once at all times. and in greece, it was an utter disaster. so, i would love to follow hovering behind him, churchill as he goes from meeting to meeting. and then when he sells his generals on the viability of going to norway or thinking about it, he says no. we will go to some mantra. he gave them fits -- we will go to sumatra. he gave them fits. >> so, you tell all kinds of stories in your. to cover the dunkirk story. what year was dunkirk. where was he in that process? >> the evacuation? >> yes. >> that would be the last week of may, the first few days of june in the 1940's. the french had been defeated essentially in brittany. the french expeditionary force, 100,000 men strong, half of them were stalled of the san -- south of the sienne. the other have spearheaded a
nations, such as france or spain whatever, you had to make george iii out to be a tyrant. so he came up with all of these arguments about what he did and that is with jefferson did. >> what did you think? >> i was not a big jeffersonian after i did all of this. he was a wordsmith. he was not a good executive when he was governor of virginia. he was not able to organize effective resistance. he was't famous until famous in the sense that we know historically now. so when he was running for president in the 17 nineties, he held in sulphide as the author of the declaration of independence. which in some ways he was. nobody even cared about that in the 1770s. but that was his claim to fame when he was running for the presidency. he and john adams died on the same day. that is when the whole thing became a sainted document. it was god's handiwork that he -- that they died on the same day. >> would you have fit back in those days? >> up probably would have been a trouble maker -- i probably would have been a trouble maker. i probably also would have been somebody who had a strategic bent. i'm
to be credible to the other nations so they could gain from france or spain, and this was another reason for the declaration of independence, you had to make george iii out to be a tyrant. sonya, with all these arguments about what he did. that is where tempers and dead. -- so they made all these arguments. >> what did you think about jefferson? >> i did not think much. he was a words maturity was not a good governor of virginia. the british almost caught him one time. he was not able to organize effective resistance. he was not famous until he was -- famous in the sense that we know him historical now -- until when he was running for president in the 17 nineties. he held himself out as the author of the declaration of independence, which in some ways he was. nobody had cared about that during 1770 s, but it helped him. that was his claim to fame when he was running for the presidency. then when he and john adams died on the same day, july 4, 1826, and that's when the whole thing became the document that this was god's handiwork, but they died on the same day. >> knowing what you know ab
to go back to france. the canadians paid in hong kong and australian and british in singapore. so after dunkirk here was a country like a boxer is down on one knee and the ref is about to call in a day. host: when did the blitz of london occur? . this is actually part of the battle of britain. the air battle, the hollywood battle of spitfires and everything began in bid july, july 10 officially. host: of 1940. guest: of 1940. that is when the invasion scare began. the germans were soften up for the final blow which churchill never believed was coming. never for a minute did he believe the germans would invade. but he had to pursue the invasion scare tactic in order to build up his armies and get more planes and get equipment from the u.s., which was dragging its feet. the final plan, the german plan, would be to soften air bases then in lit august or september crush the remnants of the r.a.f. it was a good plan but it wasn't working and goring got hitler's permission to bomb the ports. bombing was so ineffective on both sides that meant they would be bombing houses. they did. and church
with the americans over the second front. over when to go to france. churchill wanted to go everywhere. he wanted to invade norway, sumatra, trieste, italy, sicily, somewhere in france some day. and his generals were pulling their hair out and eisenhower was. wanted to be all over the map, everywhere. and the fiores -- forays to greece were utter disasters. i would love to follow hovering behind him churchill as he goes from meeting to meeting and it is norway, then when he sells his generals on maybe the viability of going to norway or thinking about it, then he says no, no, we will go to sumatra instead. he gave them fits. host: so, you would tell all kinds of stories in here. you covered the dunkirk story. where was he, what year is dunkirk, what was it and where was he in this process? guest: the evacuation? host: yes. guest: that would be the last week of m
stay on the pathway we're currently on we're headed to the nanny state which is france and greece. that concerns me a great deal and the country will not be able to deal with the leader of the free world if we continue on that pathway. >> what would that look like for the average citizen? >> the average citizen more and more their life would be dependent on uncle sam. the difference between america and the rest of the world is our founding fathers placed the highest priority on individual enterprise and individual spirit. if people are willing to say my dependent upon my own willingness to work hard and impact the process we will continue to have that driving force that makes us the strongest country in the world. if we're not careful, we will walk away from it and soon, unfortunately, we'll be like france. >> do you have any sense there is a generational sense on views how the government should serve the public among younger americans than it is among baby boomers and older? >> i'm hopeful we can convince the cross section of the younger generation that their contribution to our
. he then offered him the position as minister of france. >> michael hill on the minister to france during the 1870 franco-prussian war. they provide political and humanitarian support. sunday night at 8:00 on c-span. >> former congressional leaders discuss what washington learned from the 1990 deficit agreement that eventually helped frame the federal budget into surplus. speakers include tom fully. this is just under three hours of. >> ok. welcome. i am the director of public administration program. i want to welcome you to the session, which we are calling looking back to move a forward. this is co-sponsored by george mason university and the bipartisan policy center. it is our pleasure to put this on and to recognize with all the frenzy about the fiscal cliff that we have a history. some of the history is successful in resolving deep seated hard choices. that is will we will look back and talk about today and see whether we can learn any lessons from the experience. we will go over the detailed program in a few minutes. i want to introduce our keynote speaker tom davis. he has c
. grant offered him the position as minister of france and ambassador. >> michael hill, elihu washbourne. the only diplomat from a major power to stay during the siege of paris. son and 9:00. >> first lady mr. obama welcome to military families to the white house for this season's first u.s. of holiday decorations. the theme is the way to all. the white house christmas tree is decorated by children living on u.s. military bases around the world. the first lady's remarks are about 15 minutes. > [applause] >> hi, everyone. welcome to the white house. prequel, hu? yeah. let me start by thanking jennifer for that lovely introduction and to welcome her family here as well. her father and her husband. we are so grateful for your service and glad you could be here. thank you, jennifer, for everything that you and your family have done for this country and what you have done to make this house as beautiful as it is. as first lady, you know that i have had the privilege of traveling across this country. one of the best things i get to do is to meet with all of the wonderful military families, lik
's here with me, frances scott, and i'm very thankful to the good lord and to a strong mom who believes that sometimes love has to come at the end of a switch, and she loves me a lot. and i'll tell you that along that way, that when times got tough and when i was flunking out of high school -- when i failed world geography, civics, spanish and english -- when you fail spanish and english, they don't call you bilingual, ok? they may refer to you as biignic because you can't speak any language. i will tell you that my mother did not quit on me. i also had the good fortune of meeting a meant more from chick-fil-a who taught me basic biblical principles and it has served well. our nation finds itself in a situation where we need some backbone, we need to make very difficult decisions. so often we have a conversation about how do we create enough revenue to solve the problem. i learned early in my 20's that if you have a problem with spending, there's not enough revenue to make up for it. we have a spending problem, ladies and gentlemen, in america, and not a revenue problem. so it's very di
action. france called for aid, nothing happened. turkey called for safe haven, nothing happened. everybody is looking to the united states. unfortunately, it is the same position since august of last year, which focused more on the target sanctions and all of that. unless there is actually a change in the u.s. position to take more action, i do not think something will change in the military. building a central command of the free syrian army, that needs training, international assistance. that is something only the united states can do. >> do you have a follow up question? >> my question is, you have said the days of asad are numbered and it is only a matter of time before he falls. what can we expect to happen with them when he falls? will we see a scene similar to libya where his body is dragged through the streets? will he be tried in syria? what do you envision to happen, and what do you hope to happen? >> that is difficult to answer. we know the days of the regime is approaching. that may take one year or more. we see that with the reluctance and the hesitance of the inter
. we have disagreements with canada on trade issues. we have disagreements with france and mexico and many other countries. there is a mechanism by which we can all go to neutral refereeing of those issues. the wto is one way that we can do that. [inaudible] >> i did not have a chance to read that article. am not familiar with everything that was mentioned in that article. two months before the election, there was this big tough-on- china -- >> the pivot was announced almost a year before that. what set of the discussion of the exhibit was the announcement -- pivot was the announcement of rotating 2000 marines throughout australia. i do not think china should be fearful of 2000 marines hit in australia. -- in australia. our engagement with other countries throughout the asia- pacific region will focus on more cultural, economic assistance as well as military collaboration. even with china itself, we're engaging more with china. this has been from the very beginning of the obama administration and is also part of the pivot. the pivot is not just focusing our attention on the other
like france would be the way to go? caller: i think so. they can put a bullet lot -- a big luxury tax on the big ya chts. guest: i think it is useful to step back. what happens if we go over the fiscal cliff or get the type of deal the president is looking for? what we're talking about the top individual income-tax rate rising from 35% to 39.6%, the same tax rate we have before 2001. we do not need to be up at the 75% level. i would not advocate the go there but i think that is not really where we are and it is not where we need to be. host: we have a treat, who -- we have a tweet. they write -- host: the payroll tax is to% of income. -- guest: the payroll tax is 2% of income. the benefits of the payroll tax are larger or more important probably for low and middle income working families than they are for higher income families. that is certainly true. you have to remember that the payroll tax was a temporary provision. it actually was enacted at the end of 2010 to replace another temporary provision which was even more targeted toward low and middle income working families. i do not
for receiving the national order of the french legion of honor, the highest declaration that france bestows for meritorious service. i want to recognize him for his unwavering service to his country during world war ii and it's truly a privilege to honor a constituent who so exemplifies patriotism and the american spirit. established by napoleon bonaparte in 1482, it's a merit based distinction. the order's motto, honor and fatherland, reaffirms the celebration of patriotism and service for its recipients. victor decarlo was drafted into the army two months after he graduated from pittsburgh shindly high school in 1944. he arrived in france in 1945 and was assigned the responsibility of aiding the allied forces in reversing gains made by the german army. he first saw combat in the most -- in a region by helping forces breaking through the infamous siegfried line, a 390-mile defense system set up by the german army along the country's western border that consisted tank traps and manned bunkers. after successfully breaking through the siegfried line, he headed north to the famous battle of th
before the house gavels in at 2:00 p.m. eastern. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, france, -- friends, this is a singular honor to be a guest in this temple of civic life. thanks to all the good people for making this possible, to my publisher, the staff that are manning the barricades outside. my novel is debt crisis and the future of the world economy. i will be arguing that there is no such thing as a debt crisis. there is no debt crisis in the united states of america and europe, and there is no such thing as the debt crisis in my own country, which is nevertheless being consumed by debt. you know the joke about balloonist. the balloon has been blown off isrse, and at some point they no such thing as a debt crisis. manage to gain control of the balloon and lower it above a farm. the farmer comes out and looks up at the balloon and one of the balloonists says, excuse me, sir, where are we? and the farmer says, you are in a balloon. the balloonist says, he must be an economist. precisely accurate, and hopelessly useless. [laughter] we have a doctor here amongst us. imagine if you ha
that slavery was less expensive than these new forms? brazil, u.s., britain, france, spain. >> a very interesting question. i think my first response would be to say i'm not sure so much that all forms of slavery disappeared as so much evolved in transition. obviously, there were laws passed that made a certain thing illegal. from a paper law stand point certain things disappeared. but the case of bonded labor it showed that things did not disappear but adapt to a different set of laws and climate. then evolved around those hurdles to continue to effect the same kind of mode of exi ployation. as to whether f there was a point in the past where producers were faced with a scenario where one set of nonslave-like labor bake more economic efficient there are certainly few instances. i think the historians here would probably have those more in their head than i do. particularly in case where is laws with penalties were perceived to be enforced. then the perception is that form of exploitation is no longer beneficial. we either have to evade it and try to do something similar or adopt for
in europe is 25%. like france is not where we want to be on tax policy. the canadians are at 17%. where you have high marginal tax rates, it slows economic growth. you can see it on the corporate side and on the individual side. we will over time take the corporate rate to 25 from 35. because it will be better for growth, we will actually have more revenue for the government and not less. with government growth at 4% per year, reagan levels, versus 2% per year, france over last 20 years or obama over last four, you do that for decades, the federal cabinet raises $5 trillion in additional tax revenue. the best way to get revenue for the government at such strong, robust and jobs-creating economic growth. unfortunately, president obama and the democrats have taken the opposite direction over the last four years. that's why we are in this mess. host: now to an independent in georgia, al. if i would push the right button. sorry about that. al, good morning. caller: good morning. the last time you were on c- span, i managed to get through. it was on the heels of you going to atlanta and to chast
to reduce that to 25%. the reason is the average business tax in europe is 25%. like france is not where we want to be on tax policy. the canadians are at 17%. where you have high marginal tax rates, it slows economic growth. you can see it on the corporate side and on the individual side. we will over time take the corporate rate to 25 from 35. because it will be better for growth, we will actually have more revenue for the government and not less. with government growth at 4% per year, reagan levels, versus 2% per year, france over last 20 years or obama over last four, you do that for decades, the federal cabinet raises $5 trillion in additional tax revenue. the best way to get revenue for the government at such strong, robust and jobs-creating economic growth. unfortunately, president obama and the democrats have taken the opposite direction over the last four years. that's why we are in this mess. host: now to al, an independent in georgia. if i would push the right button. sorry about that. al, good morning. caller: good morning. the last time you were on c- span, i managed to get thr
. the next highest was france and germany. united king come 9.6. and germany and france on many measures are getting better healthcare out comes than we are. and we know if you fast forward to 2012 we're not spending that, we're over 18%. 1 in every 6 dollars in this economy is going to healthcare. and however much one saves on healthcare, 40% of that flows through to the federal government because the federal government is paying 40% of healthcare in this country, actually something more than that. there is lots of room to save money in this healthcare system and there by save money in medicare and medicaid. we're talking about a very small percentage about what we intend to spend over the next ten years in the savings that are being discussed. the same is true on discretionary savings. the president called for $200 billion. but if we put it in perspective we're going to spend in the domestic accounts in the next ten years $11.6 trillion. so a $200 billion savings is 1.7% of what we're forecast to spend. thanally can't save less 2%? of course we can. i think we've as a country, both sid
to consider 15% or something like that. france passed a thing if you go over $1 million a year, your taxes are low on the first million. after that, they are taking 75% of the money. they ought to throw a little bit of fear into these people. it just shows the control the wealthy have over the government in both parties. host: more from "the washington post." they write -- back to the telephones. derrick from maryland on the line for democrats. your thoughts about the fiscal clause bill. caller: i think they will do a good deal if they can keep mitch mcconnell out of there. one of the things i really have a problem with, that is when thing i say democrats, let's get the ground game for 2014. republicansd of the at enter the house. let's take the house and just ran it all down their throats. host: we will move onto glen on the line for independents. caller: here is the problem that we have a. we have people that are working hard for the american people. we have a constitution. we have deviated from the constitution. host: who are the people working hard for the american people? caller: the
international leader. the u.s., britain, and france told bashar al assad to step down and allow a peaceful transition. he did not act accordingly. he continued to use his security forces and the army to target the civilians and the syrian demonstrators. at exactly the same time, when the international community tried to play a role in the security council, the security council was unable, because of russia and china, which vetoed three times, and double the toe -- double veto, any actions against the assange regime. -- assad regime. should the international community's do actions beyond our outside the security council? it is not allowed for more casualties to be killed. syria, as a nation and the country, is threatened. they side effect of that, as we see right now -- more radicalization, from the country. we see increasing anti-western sentiment in syrian society. that is maybe more to hottest from other countries enough to join the syrian -- more jihadists to join the syrian regime. that is different from maybe the assad regime. he called all the freedom fighters as a terrorist or jihad
of the united states or the rights of men experience of france. the bother us with the rule of law and its -- judicial independence. rule oft bother us with law and a judicial independence. to understand its relevance, and the mainland is destined to follow it, but to learn more and be stimulated by it -- i look forward to the discussion. [applause] >> thank you, ambassador huntsman. thank you, john thornton for your exceptional china program. thank you to colleagues for organizing this wonderful day of activities. whatever this may -- whatever this event may have been called, it is above all a celebration of he weifang. he is brilliant, he is learned, he is courageous. he is a tenacious person with the soul of a saint in fighting justice, fighting for justice. he is a soul of wit who somehow convinces us that fighting for fundamental change in china is a joyful activity. [laughter] the tweet andd by sparks of with the flow from him as readily as sparks flow from an iron factory. as china watchers know, to forge iron, one must be strong. he weifang is strong. the panel has been asked under
-enter france in the iranian internal affairs. it requires president obama to make that kind of concession, at least verbally, i think the president will go for that. maybe the president thought the key to getting a nuclear deal was to go out of his way publicly to assure the iranian regime, the islamic republic of iran, that we had in fact no business interfering and we are fine with the status quo. what are your thoughts on that? what you think the impact of that would be? >> i actually attended berkeley. [laughter] bat. >> one of the challenges in the international community is if there is some sort of nuclear deal -- the man at the nuclear deal is signed, a new phase of the arms control problem emerges which is called compliance. there is the question of whether the treaty will happen. how do you sustain pressure on other aspects of sirenian miss behavior in light of the nuclear deal? human rights is one and i will come back to that but today, the islamic republic stands convicted criminal lawyer accused, but convicted of terrorism on the american homeland with the conviction of the pl
person with a ph.d. in engineering from france. dick also started to all different committees. -- they also started 12 different committees. judiciary, committee on finance, and they were working on a number of products. i love today to talk about those projects those councils are working on. >> can we say a few words between the relationship of this council and the military? what we specifically referred to as the free syrian army? >> a few months ago they found it coalesce. it is headed up by the inspector general. all of those groups do maintain their separate identities. they are all fighting under the banner of this council. i would say the relationship is characterized it has two characteristics, if corroborative one and a competitive one. if it were not for that there would be no federated areas. everyone depends on the fsa to keep the assad regime from entering the city. that is the cooperative aspect. this is going into the future. you have an emergent civil society that is trying to govern this and provide basic goods and services. when i was an uphill i saw piles up
gross domestic product on healthcare. the next highest was france and germany. united king come 9.6. and germany and france on many measures are getting better healthcare out comes than we are. and we know if you fast forward to 2012 we're not spending that, we're over 18%. 1 in every 6 dollars in this economy is going to healthcare. and however much one saves on healthcare, 40% of that flows through to the federal government because the federal government is paying 40% of healthcare in this country, actually something more than that. there is lots of room to save money in this healthcare system and there by save money in medicare and medicaid. we're talking about a very small percentage about what we intend to spend over the next ten years in the savings that are being discussed. the same is true on discretionary savings. the president called for $200 billion. discretionary savings on top of the billion that has been done. but if we put it in perspective we're going to spend in the domestic accounts in the next ten years $11.6 trillion. so a $200 billion savings is 1.7% of what w
're currently on we're headed to the nanny state which is france and greece. that concerns me a great deal and the country will not be able to deal with the leader of the free world if we continue on that pathway. >> what would that look like for the average citizen? >> the average citizen more and more their life would be dependent on urchingle sam. the difference between america and the rest of the world is our founding fathers placed the highest priority on individual enterprise and individual spirit. if people are willing to say my dependent upon my own willingness to work hard and impact the process we will continue to have that driving force that makes us the strongest country in the world. if we're not careful, we will walk away from it and soon, unfortunately, we'll be like france. >> do you have any sense there is a generational sense on views how the government should serve the public among younger americans than it is among baby boomers and older? >> i'm hopeful we can convince the cross section of the younger generation that their contribution to our system to their families, t
states army in the great world war i. he wanted to get to france as soon as he could and so he volunteered to be in the ambulance service. what he did when he got to europe was rescue and pick up other dough boys in europe out of those trenches and get them behind, take them back behind american lines so that they could be taken care of their wounds and he also picked up many of our americans, 114,000 to be exact that died in the great world war i. he was allowed or was able to come back to america alive he made it through the war. although many, as i mentioned, did not. many americans when they came home from the great war over there, as cohen said, difed the new. they picked up in europe in fact many of them a great number of them depride the spanish flu, almost as many as died in europe itself. frank buckles then went to work and during his work, he went to the philippines. when he was in the philippines, the japanese invaded in world war ii. he was captured and put in a prisoner of war camp for three and a half years. he was about to be executed and the americans came and l
%. the reason is the average business tax in europe is 25%. stupider than france is not where we want to be. canadians are at 17%. when you have these high marginal tax rates, it slows economic growth. you can see it on the corporate side and the individual side. i think we will over time take the corporate rate to 25% from 35%. because it will be better for growth, we will have more revenue for the government, not less. if the government grows at 4% per year, reagan levels, versus 2% per year, france over the last years. do that for a decade, the federal government raises $5 trillion in additional tax revenue. the best way to get revenue for the government is a strong, robust, job-creating economic growth. unfortunately, president obama and the democrats are taking the opposite direction over the last four years and that is why we are in the mess we are in. host: al is an independent in georgia. please go ahead. i need to push the right button. sorry about that, al. hang on. you are on "washington journal". caller: good morning. the last time i managed to get through was on the heels of yo
for broke regiment. he saw combat in italy and southern france and was badly wounded during an engagement for which he was awarded a distinguished service cross of which was later upgraded to the medal of honor, our highest award for military valor. with financial assistance from the g.i. bill, inouye graduated from the university of hawaii and the george washington university law school. daniel inouye won election to the united states house of representatives as the united -- the new state's first congressman. he is currently serving his eighth term in the united states senate. other people we have spoken to have talked about the first time they were sworn in as a member of congress. in 1959, you became the first member from hawaii. what was that like when you work first on the floor of the house of representatives? >> i spent some time in washington before this. i went to law school. i had never been on the floor of the chamber. it was an awesome experience for me to be among a multitude of giants and have teh speaker of the house swear me in. it was a simple ceremony, but i will never
the internet. can you imagine? going from that -- they were building 500 airplanes a year in france by then. in four years. and of course, the airplane was invented by natural selection. we did not help -- we did not know how to do with. the ones that did not tell the pilot, they are today's airplane. [laughter] i believe that kids were inspired by this wonderful short period of time. on the 100th anniversary of the wright brothers applied, at aviation week asked me and others to say what i thought about the first 100 years of aerospace. who were the movers and shakers. they wanted me to predict the next 100 years. i refused. i went ahead and i wrote an article and i picked these people and i was fortunate enough to have met all but two of these people. i think these were the ones that come to me, were the ones that really made aerospace in that first 100 years. if you do not know korlov, he was the van braun of russia. who was inspired by them -- i found out later and realized later that everyone on that list was between the age of 4 and 13. and seeing that innovation gives them the courag
and gentlemen, france, -- friends, -- her work focuses on the intersection of law, business, and morality. she has been a speaker and panelist for events and organizations around the world, including the clinton global initiative. in 2012, she was named a top observer of the economy by the agenda at product. her newest book is the "shareholder value meth -- how putting shareholders' first harms' investors, corporations, and the public." that as a tablet find irresistible. please welcome -- a title i find irresistible. please welcome the professor. [applause] >> thank you, for that and kind introduction. let me start with what an honor it is, especially students in the clinton school. i have a master's from the school of public policy -- a similar degree. i have always found it amazing i have been able to carve a career for myself, as you are doing. and thinking about how the world could be made a better place. for those of you at the clinton school, i think there is frankly no more rewarding thing that you can do. my appreciation for you. thank you very much for inviting me. speaking of making
then offered him the position as ambassador to france. >> researcher and author michael hill on elihu washburne, the only diplomat from a major power to stay during the siege of paris providing political and humanitarian support. >> "washington journal" continues. host: ari ne'eman is the president and co-founder of the autistics of advocacy network and is here to talk to us about the federal response to the rise in autism in the united states. our guest is an autistic adults and will be talking about the federal role in supporting an autistic adults and children. he testified before congress earlier this week, and that hearing was covered by c-span if you want to take a look at it. go to our website, c-span.org. thank you for being on the program. >> thank you for having me. >> first, talk to us about what is autism in terms of the spectrum of disorders and some of the symptoms people might want to be on the lookout for. >> i am really glad you asked that. often, people's perceptions of autism come from television or movies like "main man -- "rain man" or 60-second public service announcements
in addition to support other contributing countries. european union, france, others have all already begun to reengage with maliian armed forces. it's not as if there is absent support for them in the intervening period. >> what lessons have i learned if i might, both ms. dory and mr. gast. we were actively engaged, the usaid mission celebrated a 50th anniversary, we were very involved in trying to sustain a culture democracy. whatlesssons are there that we might learn going forward about political failures, ignored domestic issues, our rather abrupt requirement that we break off relations and support here has created a great difficulty with regional consequences. what lessons would you suggest we learn from that? >> thank you, senator. excellent question. i would say in the best of times, mali is in a -- is a country in crisis. when one looks at a human development index, they rank in the bottom dozen. that's -- as assistant secretary carson mentioned, 90% of the population is in the south and that population is also in need of services. and so it is unfortunate that the government hasn't
nations combined. many of our allies like france and england. the united states is a global power with global responsibilities. it is a real sense of debate. our budgets tends to come down after we fight wars. what is the appropriate role for the united states military in the world? maybe allies can take care of this and maybe we do not need to do. host: how much do we spend? guest: about $600 billion a year from year to year. it is hard to estimate countries like china because they are now pricing things the same way. they have large land forces and they are not deployed across the world. submarines and missiles. china is probably number one on the list. host: this from twitter. guest: that refers to overseas contingency operations. this is a fund that paid for the wars in iraq. it is about $88 billion in that account. there is a pentagon and washington funny math. some people say if the project out, we will save all this money. i wrote a report about saving $1 trillion. most of our troops will be out of afghanistan by 2014. nobody expects it will spend this level of money going
or napoleon's france, alexander the great mesopotamia. it is a progressive thing every society seems to go through. it goes from civilize to being uncivilized. host: beyond the disrespect you feel that you got as a kid to -- from the kids, what did you think about the security at the school? did you feel safe from perhaps an attack from the outside? caller: they had the doors locked. you had to ring a bell before you came in. if anybody wants to get into one of the schools and they come in with weapons, these military type equipment, there is no door that will stop them anyway. they can shoot the locks right off the door and they will be into the school within seconds. once somebody is going to do something like that that has their mind set on it, to stop it is next to impossible. there is no way of forcing it. i wish there was, but it is like terrorism. when somebody wants to create an act of terrorism, there is basically no way of stopping them. host: we will move on to joy in california. caller: good morning first. i would like to send out my condolences to all of the children and loved
since world war ii? i mean, i don't think germany's going to invade france any time soon or russia's going to invade poland. but yet we have a huge amount of deployed american forces in europe. i mean, maybe we need to have a discussion about whether or not we need that. whether or not we can afford that expense. whether or not that does anything to enhance our security. again, i want a military that is the best in the world, i want it to continue to be that way, i want it to be second to none. i want to make sure we have all that we need but i don't want to be investing in things we don't need. and when the joint chiefs of staff and when the secretary of defense and all the experts tell us that they don't need something and we here appropriate money to keep something going that is unnecessary, that is unwanted, at the same time while you're trying to cut the benefits of some poor old lady, her social security, there's something wrong with this equation. we got to start thinking about the security of people here in this country as well. and what we're going to do right after this i
to do that? do we need to go to coalition partners britain and france? where is the potential for mission creep and escalation? which is exactly what we house -- what we saw happen in somalia and it dovetailed off over mogadishu. and i do not think you mentioned to the warlords, did you? gregg's warlords are not here. of taking care of these problems. >> that is foreign internal defense. >> right now we have three personnel who are part of the monusco mission. when we had the training effort underway for the 391st, it was about 60 folks. there are now out. it is a limited footprint. about 17,000 u.n. troops in the congo. >> all of these different non state, non uniform belligerents coming together against our efforts, is there a potential there? >> no. i would like to underscore what has been said. we're not talking about american soldiers on the ground, engaged against rebel groups in the drc. that is not something that is in our game plan or in our thinking. what we need to focus on -- >> train and enable? >> to train and unable, build capacity. >> build capacity, an able an
and france are about to go in recession. when you have a shaky economy, piling on taxes does not work. spain's has been raising taxes. we have not seen anything like this with governments deliberately raising taxes on a scale since the early 1930's. they should be going in the opposite direction. they are putting more burdens on the private economies. host: somebody who may be in your income group wrote an op-ed about a month ago and this is part of it. i want to get your reaction. guest: in terms of income and what people effectively pay in tax rates, people and higher incomes pay effective tax rates three times those earning middle incomes in this country. salaried income versus capital gains gets confused. capital gains are no sure things. it is a high-risk proposition. there has always been a lower rate for capital gains. you would see this economy crater and hope of investment and go by the boards. bill clinton lowered the tax rates. to reverse that trend, that was a bad decade, the 1970 's. we have seen that in other countries. raise the rates and you get less investment and a lower st
airplanes a year in france by then. in four years. and of course, the airplane was invented by natural selection. we did not know how to do with. the ones that did not tell the pilot, they are today's airplane. [laughter] i believe that kids were inspired by this wonderful short period of time. on the 100th anniversary of the wright brothers applied, at aviation week asked me and others to say what i thought about the first 100 years of aerospace. who were the movers and shakers. they wanted me to predict the next 100 years. i refused. i went ahead and i wrote an article and i picked these people and i was fortunate enough to have met all but two of these people. i think these were the ones that come to me, were the ones that really made aerospace in that first 100 years. if you do not know korlov, he was the van braun of russia. who was inspired by them -- i found out later and realized later that everyone on that list was between the age of 4 and 13. and seeing that innovation gives them the courage to try something really hard, and that is why they did the accomplishment. my first b
to fight against the tax increase for the wealthiest people. they take a ski vacation in france and a cost $20,000. they spend money like it is garbage. cheerleading for tax breaks for people who do not need it. they have admitted they do not need it. the republicans and the democrats are not facing the key issue with our budget, which is medical cost. it is insanity we do not hear enough and i wish c-span would have more programs dealing with all of the options that could lessen the burden on the government and the taxpayer for the medical costs. i believe that in medicare buy- in -- i have 10 years left to go until medicare. i pay $620 a month for my health care. that is a lot of money. i would give that to the government and would usn't use t $100 or $200 a year. host: that is an important issue. we will focus more as the affordable care act t kicks in. for the suggestion -- thank you for the suggestion. the deficit is close to $16.4 trillion. this is part of the debate we will see at the start of the new congress. the so-called fiscal cliff was coined by ben bernanke. the story from "r
for democrats. caller: how are you? good morning. well, france has a luxury tax of 75%. they're fighting a renouncing it is unconstitutional. i guess if we're going to go off the cliff, we will go off the cliff. the pen is mightier than the sword. the people that put us there, get rid of them. as all i can say. host: do you think going to a luxury tax would be the way to go? caller: i think so. the comparative luxury tax on the big yachts on the water down in florida. -- they can put a luxury tax on the yachts on the water in florida. guest: i think it is useful to step back. what happens if we go over the fiscal cliffs or even we get the type of deal that the president is looking for? what we are talking about is the top individual income-tax rate rising from 35% to 39.6%. that was the same texture that we had before 2001. -- that is the same tax rate that we had before 2001. we do not need to be up at the 75% level. i would not advocate that we go to the 75% level. that is not really where we are. that is not where we need to be. host: we hae a tweet. guest: the payroll tax is basicall
of syria and our allies in europe, some of which have now been ahead of us, like france, that we will focus on this immediate, potentially disastrous threat that assad will use chemical and biological weapons. >> you said a moment ago that iran is our most dangerous enemy. if so, how far should we be willing to go to prevent iran from acquiring nuclear weapons? >> i did echo what everyone has said, right up to president obama, that it is unacceptable for us to allow iran to become a nuclear state. containment is not an acceptable alternative. it changes the whole balance of power in the middle east. emboldens the terrorist like hamas and hezbollah that are agents of the iranian government. it probably lead some of our allies in the world to begin to accommodate to iran. it is a threat to most of the rest of the world, including us. the sanctions have been unprecedented. they are having an effect on the iranian economy so far, not an observable effect on the iranian regime at all. we have to make sure that our threats of military action, if they don't take down their nuclear weapons program,
with britain and france. what are you talking about? then he again to berate the defense ministry, saying you have been robbing our people spending so much on defense you are scaring everybody else. that has given them an excuse for an arms race and i will tell you comrades, if we let them get by with forcing us into an arms race we are going to lose it. exactly what president reagan was trying to do tactically. i would say that people at the time -- i know some of marvin's colleagues would say reagan really didn't pay that much attention to details, his eyes would glaze over if you got in numbers of missiles and warheads and stuff. and, true, he didn't look at those things. he concentrated on the basic things. how do i understand this other fellow and convince him to do something that is actually in his own interests because his current pil policies are not. we spent much more time, and i think effective time, talking to reagan about where gorbachev was coming from and what his pressures were and one fof the things that we needed to do was to convince them we were not out to do them in. amon
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